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Matt Scherocman

Microsoft Azure Learning Roadmap

Microsoft Azure Learning Roadmap

Microsoft Azure Roadmap

Microsoft’s Azure platform is an every changing platform. We are often asked is there a place I can go to find out what’s going on with Azure, what’s changing and when? Well, today we have that answer for you. Below you will find a small sample from an Azure learning roadmap, some are videos, or demos, tutorials and even sample apps:

  • Deep Dive – a video recording from a TechEd conference in Europe
  • Azure Search scenarios and capabilities – primary scenarios enabled by current functionality
  • Introduction to Azure search – Video recording the explains the architecture and capabilities of Azure search

As you’ll see when you visit the Microsoft site found here, there are lots of ways to keep up with what’s going on with Azure.  A notable omission on this site is licensing. If you would like to learn what licensing options you have available give us a call and we can walk you through your options along with information on any Microsoft funding that is available. 

Microsoft EA Renewal
Matt Scherocman

What are the differences between Office 365 Business Plans and Enterprise Plans?

To say that Office 365 gives you plenty of options, would be an understatement. In today’s blog we’ll take a look at what options are available for Businesses and what some of the differences are. First, let’s take a look at what options you have:

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Can you mix and match the options? The short answer is yes, however, for the best answer possible give us a call and we can talk you through what options make the most sense and why. For examples, some users can even take advantage of a light weight account called a Kiosk plan which could be even cheaper.

Are there differences in support?

Yes, a key difference in the plans centers around 24/7 Support. The Enterprise plans cover all issues; however, the Business plans only cover: Critical Issues.

Let’s take a look at how Microsoft defines critical issues. Only your organization can decide if not having phone coverage is worth it or not for high level issues. That single user could be the owner / CEO.

Severity Level

Operations and Support Description

Examples

Sev A (Critical)

One or more services aren’t accessible or are unusable. Production, operations, or deployment deadlines are severely affected, or there will be a severe impact on production or profitability. Multiple users or services are affected.

  • Widespread problems sending or receiving mail.
  • SharePoint site down.
  • All users can’t send instant messages, join or schedule Lync Meetings, or make Lync calls.

Sev B (High)

The service is usable but in an impaired fashion. The situation has moderate business impact and can be dealt with during business hours. A single user, customer, or service is partially affected.

  • One user can’t access email.
  • One user or admin can’t access SharePoint site.
  • Several users can’t send instant messages, join or schedule Lync Meetings, or make Lync calls.

Is Office Any Different?

Yes, the version of Office in the business plans does not include Access or some of the pre-installed components to make items like data loss prevention and rights management work.

I have terminal server in my environment, does that matter?

Enterprise Plans support a terminal server environment whereas the Business plans do not support a terminal services environment.

Are there any hidden gotchas?

Hybrid configurations and On-Premises are supported in the Enterprise plans only. Business plans do not support either the hybrid or On-Premise options. So, users of the Business plans would only be allowed to deploy the technology in the cloud.

Keep these differences in mind as you plan out your cloud strategy and what plans make the most sense for your company. For a more comprehensive listing of additional support offerings that are offered with the Business Plans please see the link here. Or drop us a line to discuss your options!

Microsoft EA Renewal
Matt Scherocman

Updates to OneDrive on Mobile Devices

OneDrive mobile apps have all recently been updated.  OneDrive for Andriod has updates that make it easier to differentiate between your work and personal OneDrive accounts, as well as support for adding a PIN number to keep files secure.  On iOS, there is now a feature that allows searching inside the OneDrive app as well as “All photos view” to make it easier to monitor camera backup to OneDrive.  On Windows Phone 8.1 there is now the ability for users to access their OneDrive recycle bin to make it easier to restore accidentally deleted files and folders.  Finally, across the board, OneDrive is now allowing file sizes up to 10GB to allow users to store large files on OneDrive.

Click this link to read more on the Microsoft Blog: https://blog.onedrive.com/onedrive-gets-smarter-on-your-phone/

Microsoft EA Renewal
Matt Scherocman

Simultaneous Editing in Office 365

Simultaneous Editing in Office 365

With simultaneous editing in Office 365 your employees can save time by working together on the same document and can easily bounce ideas off of each other. In the past, employees would have to email the file and keep updating it as they made changes. Now they can make all the changes on the same document avoiding countless emails back and forth. This synthesizes all the work onto the same document, so there is no longer multiple versions of the same document.

For example, your team can work in Web Apps for a collaborative working meeting to get a shared project done. If someone on your team isn't available that teammate can chose to make revisions whenever he's able to. His changes will sync up to the document stored in the cloud when he saves. Even if he is offline, his changes will sync back up to the cloud when he gets back online. What are you waiting for? Start collaborating now!

Simultaneous Editing

All Functionality Requires SharePoint Online as the document management system.

To read more about co-authoring click here for the full article. 

Matt Scherocman

Does a Client have to Purchase another set of Licenses if they want to Run Workloads for Disaster Recovery?

The Answer is No! Provided that they jump through a large set of hurdles...

Disaster Recovery Rights

For each instance of eligible server software you run in a physical or virtual OSE on a licensed server, you may temporarily run a backup instance in a physical or virtual OSE on a server dedicated to disaster recovery. The license terms for the software and the following limitations apply to your use of software on a disaster recovery server.

The OSE on the disaster recovery server can run only during the following exception periods:

  • For brief periods of disaster recovery testing within one week every 90 days
  • During a disaster, while the production server being recovered is down
  • Around the time of a disaster, for a brief period, to assist in the transfer between the primary production server and the disaster recovery server

In order to use the software under disaster recovery rights, you must comply with the following terms:

  • The OSE on the disaster recovery server must not be running at any other times except as above.
  • The OSE on the disaster recovery server may not be in the same cluster as the production server.
  • Windows Server license is not required for the disaster recovery server if the following conditions are met:
  • The Hyper-V role within Windows Server is used to replicate virtual OSEs from the production server at a primary site to a disaster recovery server.
  • The disaster recovery server may be used only to run hardware virtualization software, such as Hyper-V, provide hardware virtualization services, run software agents to manage the hardware virtualization software, serve as a destination for replication, receive replicated virtual OSEs, test failover, and await failover of the virtual OSEs.
  • Run disaster recovery workloads as described above.
  • The disaster recovery server may not be used as a production server.
  • Use of the software in the OSE on the disaster recovery server should comply with the license terms for the software.
  • Once the disaster recovery process is complete and the production server is recovered, the OSE on the disaster recovery server must not be running at any other times except those times allowed here.
  • Maintain Software Assurance coverage for all CALs, External Connector licenses and Server Management Licenses under which you access your licensed software running on the disaster recovery server and manage the OSEs in which that software runs.
  • Your right to run the backup instances ends when your Software Assurance coverage ends.

These rules come from the Microsoft product use rights guide page 70 (will change).

To see the Full Guide to Microsoft's Product Use Rights, Click Here: http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/products/products.aspx

 

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All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The owner of this blog makes no representations or warranties regarding the information from our partners or other external sources.

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