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Sarah Bunt

[On-Demand Webinar] Microsoft Azure Disaster Recovery Scenarios - with Demo

[On-Demand Webinar] Microsoft Azure Disaster Recovery Scenarios - with Demo

Ensure your critical business data is never lost and always safe.

An entirely new breed of threats has emerged that can to knock out your business applications and data.

Join Microsoft and Microsoft Heartland Area Partner of the Year - Interlink Cloud Advisors for an exclusive on-demand webinar that demonstrates how Azure Site Recovery - a hybrid solution for disaster recovery - protects and maintains all your applications and data, without having to maintain a secondary data center.  

view Azure Disaster Recovery Scenarios

Designed for all business and IT professionals, this session walks you through the Azure Site Recovery solution includes a product overview and live demo.

This webinar covers some of the most common workload scenarios and questions, including:

  • Overview of Disaster Recovery solutions
  • Prioritizing workloads for failover
  • Building plans to encompass all types of disasters
  • Pricing options
  • Funding available from Microsoft

Plus, you’ll hear a ton of questions that were asked from our audience during the live event.

View this on-demand event now to hear best practices and insights into using the cloud as your disaster recovery tool.


Presenter

mike wilson

Mike Wilson
V. President | Managing Consultant
Microsoft VTSP and Top Microsoft Cloud Certified

Matt Scherocman

Is Disaster Recovery important when using the cloud? Yes!

Disaster Recovery or DR for short, is a hot topic for many companies and with the spate of hacks and natural disasters and incredible storms, i.e. the snowstorm that hit Buffalo, NY just a few weeks ago, has many companies revisiting their disaster recovery solutions. Today’s blog will talk about DR for your applications running in
Azure.

 

Just because you are storing your app in the cloud doesn’t mean you don’t need a DR strategy, should something like mentioned above happen; are you fully prepared for a temporary or even large scale failure? Before you answer that question, let me ask you another question. Does your company rehearse these failures? Has your company determined what applications, should they go down, what your tolerance level is for that app(s)? Some things to consider when creating your cloud DR plan:

  1. Test your recovery of databases to ensure you have the correct process in place
  2. High Availability
  3. Availability
  4. Scalability
  5. Fault Tolerance

Azure DR

DR is a key component to every company’s long-term success. Taking a short-sighted approach to a DR strategy isn’t sound business. As more and more companies put more and more business critical applications in the cloud, the attention paid to DR needs to be evaluated with each application that goes into the cloud, the impact its failure can have on a company and the impact it can have as it is recovered.

In addition to dealing with unexpected disasters, rolling back failed changes and handling data corruption issues are key considerations that sometimes get forgotten when deploying to cloud platforms with greater than 99.99% uptime. 

Microsoft Azure services have a number of ways that you can meet this challenge.  For more detailed information on how to setup your Azure DR strategy for your applications running in Azure you can check out a white paper here.

Microsoft EA Renewal
Matt Scherocman

Does a Client have to Purchase another set of Licenses if they want to Run Workloads for Disaster Recovery?

The Answer is No! Provided that they jump through a large set of hurdles...

Disaster Recovery Rights

For each instance of eligible server software you run in a physical or virtual OSE on a licensed server, you may temporarily run a backup instance in a physical or virtual OSE on a server dedicated to disaster recovery. The license terms for the software and the following limitations apply to your use of software on a disaster recovery server.

The OSE on the disaster recovery server can run only during the following exception periods:

  • For brief periods of disaster recovery testing within one week every 90 days
  • During a disaster, while the production server being recovered is down
  • Around the time of a disaster, for a brief period, to assist in the transfer between the primary production server and the disaster recovery server

In order to use the software under disaster recovery rights, you must comply with the following terms:

  • The OSE on the disaster recovery server must not be running at any other times except as above.
  • The OSE on the disaster recovery server may not be in the same cluster as the production server.
  • Windows Server license is not required for the disaster recovery server if the following conditions are met:
  • The Hyper-V role within Windows Server is used to replicate virtual OSEs from the production server at a primary site to a disaster recovery server.
  • The disaster recovery server may be used only to run hardware virtualization software, such as Hyper-V, provide hardware virtualization services, run software agents to manage the hardware virtualization software, serve as a destination for replication, receive replicated virtual OSEs, test failover, and await failover of the virtual OSEs.
  • Run disaster recovery workloads as described above.
  • The disaster recovery server may not be used as a production server.
  • Use of the software in the OSE on the disaster recovery server should comply with the license terms for the software.
  • Once the disaster recovery process is complete and the production server is recovered, the OSE on the disaster recovery server must not be running at any other times except those times allowed here.
  • Maintain Software Assurance coverage for all CALs, External Connector licenses and Server Management Licenses under which you access your licensed software running on the disaster recovery server and manage the OSEs in which that software runs.
  • Your right to run the backup instances ends when your Software Assurance coverage ends.

These rules come from the Microsoft product use rights guide page 70 (will change).

To see the Full Guide to Microsoft's Product Use Rights, Click Here: http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/products/products.aspx

 

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