Interlink Cloud Blog

Interlink Cloud Blog

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All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The owner of this blog makes no representations or warranties regarding the information from our partners or other external sources.
Matt Scherocman

What is Versionless?

Versionless software is software that is always up to date with incremental improvements.  Microsoft has flipped the coin.  Clients used to have to wait for functionality to be available in the cloud.  Now the cloud gets the functionality first and on premise comes later.  This change is tremendous for clients.  The number one obstacle that clients have told me to utilizing new software is the deployment.  Now in the cloud, Microsoft takes care of that deployment and keeps the product up to date.  From the slides you can see their commitment to the cloud and how much functionality is being released on a regular basis. The 2013 graphic was produced in the late summer time frame so it doesn’t include new functionality like encryption included in the E3 plans that came out later in the year.
What we've delivered 1

What We've Delivered 2

 

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Matt Scherocman

What Are The Different Options for Microsoft Office?

 

The following chart highlights the differences/similarities between Microsoft Office Products, to help you better understand what product will best fit your needs.


 b2ap3_thumbnail_office-365-versions-2.PNG_20140414-190552_1.jpg
 
For more information on each, please see the links below:
Traditional Office Pro
Office 365 Pro Plus
Office Web Apps
Office Mobile


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Matt Scherocman

How Does The Office in Office 365 and Terminal Servers Work?

Office Pro Plus licensed through Office 365 is powerful while each licensed user can install the software on up to five devices for their own usage.  What happens when one of those devices needs to be a terminal server?

The problem is that terminal server cannot use the downloaded media from Office 365 while the 365 version includes subscription authentication.  Basically, this is technology that allows the software to verify that it has been paid for by connecting the installation to a user’s access for Office 365.  This authentication breaks when installed onto a terminal server due to the multiple user nature of the technology.

So, Microsoft has granted an exception for users to be able to take advantage of the exception.

“ Media Eligibility with Remote Desktop Services (RDS) If the user to whom you have assigned an Office 365 ProPlus license uses the software on a network server with RDS role enabled, in lieu of installing a copy of the software provided with Office 365 ProPlus on one of the five permitted devices pursuant to the Product Use Rights for Office 365 ProPlus, that user may 1) install one copy of the Office Professional Plus 2013 software on a network server and 2) access the Office Professional Plus 2013 software from any device.  Upon termination of your Office 365 ProPlus subscription you must uninstall Office Professional Plus 2013 software from the network server.”   This is from Microsoft Product Use Rights Guide - http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/about-licensing/product-licensing.aspx which is the best source for Microsoft licensing rules.

Practically, customers need to procure a single volume license media copy of Office Professional Plus and install that directly on the terminal server.  Most customer will already own this copy from a previous volume license (Open, Select, or EA Agreement).  For the clients who still need media, my suggestion would be to open a new Open Business agreement with Microsoft.  These agreements are low commitment with only five licenses of any type needed.  An organization could order a single copy of Office Professional Plus and then four other low cost items.  Hosted encryption, which can be used with Office 365 to encrypt sensitive emails can be had for less than $25 per year.

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Matt Scherocman

What Are the Differences Between Exchange Online Protection (EOP) and ForeFront Online Protection (FOPE) ?

Microsoft's new antispam and antivirus engine is called Exchange Online Protection (EOP).  In general, EOP offers the same capabilities as the previously known ForeFront Online Protection for Exchange (FOPE), with improvements such as a streamlined management console, better reporting tools, a new policy rules engine based on transport rules, EU routing capabilities, and enhanced anti-spam capabilities.  Here is a feature-by-feature comparison of and EOP.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn305011(v=exchg.150).aspx

Also, check out the service description for EOP:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/exchange-online-protection-service-description.aspx
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Matt Scherocman

Can I Limit Access to Office 365 For Remote or Hourly Users?

Limiting Access to Office 365 Services Based on Location

 Office 365 and Exchange Online continue to use Outlook Web App, Outlook MAPI, Outlook Anywhere, and ActiveSync for client connections.  Customers have expressed concerns about data loss while outside of the network and would want policies in place that limit access to Office 365 services, depending on where the client resides.

 If using ADFS 2.0 for single sign on to Office 365 services, we can also enable built in client access policy features.

 Client Access Policy Scenarios

Block all external access to Office 365 Office 365 access is allowed from all clients on the internal corporate network, but requests from external clients are denied based on the IP address of the external client.
Block all external access to Office 365, except Exchange ActiveSync Office 365 access is allowed from all clients on the internal corporate network, as well as from any external client devices, such as smart phones, that make use of Exchange ActiveSync. All other external clients, such as those using Outlook, are blocked.
Block all external access to Office 365, except for browser-based applications such as Outlook Web Access or SharePoint Online Blocks external access to Office 365, except for passive (browser-based) applications such as Outlook Web Access or SharePoint Online.
Block all external access to Office 365 for members of designated Active Directory groups. This scenario is used for testing and validating client access policy deployment. It blocks external access to Office 365 only for members of one or more Active Directory group. It can also be used to provide external access only to members of a group.

Using ADFS Client Access policies in conjunction with disabling Outlook cached mode will give clients full control of where their data can be accessed in any given scenario.

This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties, and confers no rights.

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Recent comment in this post
Guest — Exchange Activesync
Thanks for the update
Tuesday, 12 November 2013 12:11
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Welcome to the Interlink Cloud Blog

All content provided on this blog is for informational purposes only. The owner of this blog makes no representations or warranties regarding the information from our partners or other external sources.